Carl H. Gibson Home Page

Click here for a Gibson biographical sketch.
Letterhead information.

Some courses I teach:

AMES 101A Introductory Fluid Mechanics (Summer 1996) Grades: Summer 1997
AMES 103A Introductory Fluid Mechanics (Summer 1996) Grades: Summer 1997

AMES 101B Introductory Fluid Mechanics (Summer 1997)

AMES 101B Introductory Fluid Mechanics Winter 1998

AMES 101A, 103A (Summer 1998)

AMES 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Fall 1998)


STPA 35 Society and The Sea (Fall 1998)

AMES 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 1999)

AMES 101A, 103A (Summer 1999)

STPA 35 Society and The Sea (Fall 1999)

AMES (MAE) 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2000)

AMES/MAE 101A, 103A (Summer 2000)

STPA 35 Society and The Sea (Fall 2000)

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2001)

STPA 35 Society and The Sea (Fall 2001)

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2002)

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Spring 2002)

STPA 35 Society and The Sea (Fall 2002)

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Fall 2002)

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2003)

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Fall 2003)

STPA 35 Society and The Sea (Fall 2003)

MAE 87 Freshman Seminar: New Observations and Ideas about Cosmology (Fall 2003)

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2004)

MAE 87 Freshman Seminar: New Observations and Ideas about Cosmology (Winter 2004)

STPA 35 Society and The Sea (Fall 2004)

MAE 87 Freshman Seminar: New Observations and Ideas about Cosmology (Fall 2004)

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2005)

MAE 87 Freshman Seminar: New Observations and Ideas about Cosmology (Winter 2005)

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Spring 2005)

MAE 87 Freshman Seminar: New Observations and Ideas about Cosmology (Spring 2005)

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Fall 2005)

STPA 35 Society and The Sea (Fall 2005)

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2006)

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Fall 2006)

STPA 35 Society and The Sea (Fall 2006 )

MAE 192 New Cosmology (Fall 2006 )

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2007) Instructor: Dr. Valentin Shevchenko, ECE Department, 858-534-8547, vshevche@ucsd.edu.

MAE 87 New Cosmology (Spring 2007) Preprints: Dark energy or planets? , Cold Dark Matter?

red dotMAE 192 New Cosmology (Spring 2007) Preprints: Dark energy or planets? , Cold Dark Matter?

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Spring 2007)

MAE 87 New Cosmology (Fall 2007) Preprints: Dark energy or planets? , Cold Dark Matter?

red dotMAE 192 New Cosmology (Fall 2007) Preprints: Dark energy or planets? , Cold Dark Matter?

MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Fall 2007)

STPA 35 Society and The Sea (Fall 2007)

MAE 87 New Cosmology (Winter 2008)

red dotMAE 192 New Cosmology (Winter 2008)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Spring 2008)

MAE 87 New Cosmology (Spring 2008)

red dotMAE 192 New Cosmology (Spring 2008)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Fall 2008 )

dotSTPA 35 Society and The Sea (Fall 2008 )

MAE 87 New Cosmology (Fall 2008 )

red dotMAE 192 New Cosmology (Fall 2008 )

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2009)

MAE 87 8am New Cosmology (Winter 2009)

red dotMAE 192 10am New Cosmology (Winter 2009)

MAE 87 8am New Cosmology (Spring 2009)

red dotMAE 192 10am New Cosmology (Spring 2009)

dotSTPA 35 Society and The Sea (Fall 2009)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Fall 2009)

MAE 87 8am New Cosmology (Fall 2009)

red dotMAE 192 10am New Cosmology (Fall 2009)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2010)

MAE 87 8am New Cosmology (Winter 2010)

red dotMAE 192 10am New Cosmology (Winter 2010)

dotSTPA 35 Society and The Sea (Fall 2010)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Fall 2010)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2011)

mae5MAE 87 8am New Cosmology (Winter 2011)

mae5MAE 221B Mass Transfer (Winter 2011)

MAE 87 8am New Cosmology (Spring 2011 )

Summer School Session I, 2011

dotSTPA 35 Society and The Sea (Summer 2011)

MAE 101A (Summer 2011)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2012)

SIO 87 8am New Cosmology (Winter 2012)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Spring 2012)

red dotSIO 87 8am New Cosmology (Spring 2012)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2013)

red dotSIO 87 8am New Cosmology (Winter 2013)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Spring 2013)

red dotSIO 87 8am New Cosmology (Spring 2013)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Fall 2013)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2014)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Spring 2014)

red dotSIO 87 8amNew Cosmology (Fall 2014)

red dotSIO 87 8amNew Cosmology (Winter 2015)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2015)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Spring 2015)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Fall 2015)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Winter 2016)

mae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Spring 2016)

red dotmae5MAE 5 Quantitative Computer Skills (Fall 2016)

red dotSIO 87 8amNew Cosmology (Winter 2013)

Leiden Netherlands Lorentz Center workshop on New Directions in Modern Cosmology, September 27 to October 1, 2010.

Proceedings of Lorentz Center Workshop, for Journal of Cosmology, Volume 15.

Issue on Hoyle/Wickramasinghe Cometary Panspermia, Journal of Cosmology, Volume 16.

Issue on New Directions in Modern Cosmology, Journal of Cosmology, Volume 17.

Issue on Extreme Conditions on Earth, Space, and in Time, Journal of Cosmology, Volume 18.

Issues on Astro-Theology, Journal of Cosmology Summer and Fall 2012, Volume 19, Volume 20.

Issue on Stratified Turbulence Experiments in Hawaii, 2002, 2003, 2004 with Russian Colleagues, Volume 21.

Poster advertizing MAE 87 New Cosmology Spring 2011 "We are all aliens!" SIO 87 New Cosmology Fall 2011.

Poster advertising MAE 192 (and MAE 87 at 8am) Winter 2009 (Starts January 14, 10am, EBUII 479). Dark Flow.

Poster advertising MAE 192 (and MAE 87 at 8am) Spring 2009 (Starts April 8, 10am, EBUII 479). Dark Flow Spring 2009 .

http://iopscience.iop.org/1402-4896/2010/T142 Turbulent Mixing and beyond 2009 special issue in Physica Scripta December 2010.


An annotated publication list is given below. For reprints or copies of these papers, email cgibson@ucsd.edu, or click here.

newPublications (A-list, C-list) with links (work in progress) to pdf versions of papers (Nov. 26, 2008, bio-bibliography).

New Cosmology Souvenir Shop (proceeds go to MAE 87 and MAE 192 cookie fund).

Big Bang to dark matter planets Button No Dark Energy! Button

Large documents and talks are stashed in Miscellaneous large documents 2007/2008.

click here for publication list
Reprints and preprints about Gibson (1988-2003) gravitational structure formation, big bang turbulence, and fossil turbulence theories. New preprint about Helix Planetary Nebula.
Flash animations of turbulence, big bang turbulence, and a model for surface manifestations of municipal outfall fossil turbulence by student Pak Tao Leung. You need QuickTime to view the movies.
Talk at American Astronomical Society meeting, San Diego, CA January 11, 200l. [123.07] The fluid mechanics of dark matter formation: Earth-mass Primordial Fog Particles (PFPs), ProtoGlobularstarClusters (PGCs), and WIMPLITEsuperhalos.
Abstract "The First Turbulent Mixing and Combustion" for the Kingston, Canada, IUTAM meeting June 3-6, 2001. See preprint on "The First Turbulence" for further information. The CMB temperature spectrum has recently been extended by interferometer measurements, but without corrections for the intermittency of big-bang fossil temperature turbulence. See Max Tegmark's webpage about the theory and measurements of the cosmic microwave background spectrum.
Evidence that the "big-bang" was driven by a powerful turbulence event is given by extended self-similarity (ESS) coefficients of CMB temperature fluctuations, which perfectly match those of high Reynolds number turbulence (from calculations of A. Bershadskii and K. Sreenivasan). According to Bershadskii, "Kolmogorov's fingerprints are all over the CMB".
APS/DFD minisymposium in honor of Charles W. Van Atta, November 19, 2001, San Diego. Organizers and speakers.
The Remote Anthropogenic Sensor Program (Ocean Sciences 2006 Poster) is a test of the ability of Russian scientists to detect the existence, location, and hydrodynamic properties of submerged remnants of previous turbulence (fossil turbulence) from space satellite pictures. A field test was carried out in August-September 2002 using the wastefield produced by the Sand Island Municipal outfall off the Honolulu airport as the source of the submerged turbulence and fossil turbulence. See Pak Tao Leung's research website. Second and third field tests RASP 2003 and RASP 2004 were carried out August-September 2003, 2004, to provide microstructure sea-truth to the remarkable result of RASP II in August-September 2002 showing detection of submerged outfall remants at distances up to 10 km SW of the diffuser pipe. Optical images show anomalies covering up to 200 km^2 to 20 km from the diffuser, and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images show anomalies from the outfall covering 800 km^2 to 45 km. The physical mechanism reflects the maser-action ability of fossil turbulence patches to extract energy from ambient internal waves, producing new turbulence and fossils that radiate fossil turbulence waves toward the surface where patterns of the ambient internal waves are sensed as anomalies. Reprint of Geophysical Research Letters 2005 (published in Vol. 32, L12610, doe:10.1029/2005GL022390). Preprints give details of the remote sensing of submerged turbulence Gibson,Bondur,Keeler Leung 2006a, and the energetics of the beamed zombie turbulence maser action mixing chimney mechanism Gibson, Bondur, Keeler, Leung 2006b. See the SPIE paper 6680-33 Submerged turbulence detection by optical satellite, astro-ph/0709.0074v1 from San Diego Coastal Ocean Remote Sensing conf. Aug. 27, 2007.


Some pretty pictures from papers in progress:

BOOMERANG measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature spectrum fail to show a strong secondary sonic peak, and raise the question "Sound or Structure?" for the interpretation of the primary peak. Abstract, Figure (adapted from Wayne Hu's 2000, Nature 404, p939 article). Figure.pdf. Indications of fossil Big Bang turbulence can be inferred from the BOOMERANG spectra (pdf). A cartoon shows a possible mechanism of the process at Planck scales.

Figure from "Turbulence in the ocean, atmosphere, galaxy, and universe" in the May, 1996, issue of Applied Mechanics Review, showing a model for the the evolution of structure in the universe due to self-gravitation controlled by turbulence and viscous forces: Hydrodynamic history of the universe. Two new forms of dark matter emerge from the theory; "primordial fog particles" (Moon to Earth mass rogue planets...thirty million per star in a galaxy) that condensed when the plasma universe turned to gas 300,000 years after the big bang, and "WIMP" (weakly interacting massive particles such as neutrinos) that form outer galaxy halos and galaxy cluster superhalos.

Figure from an article titled "Fossils of primordial turbulence and non-turbulence at the Schwarz Radii---the length scales of condensation for self-gravitating fluid matter": Primordial fog comets from latest HST release. which may show primordial fog particles in the Helix Planetary nebula. Gas shells emitted from the dying star may be bringing these highly volatile (frozen hydrogen-helium planet) "comets" out of cold storage.
The first images in Jan. 2000 of the serviced Hubble Space Telescope included the Eskimo Nebula NGC2392, which shows PFP candidates as "comets" in the "parka" just like those in the Helix Pn.

Figure from the same article showing star formation in the Eagle open star cluster and nebula (M-16), with the proposed "Schwarz-turbulence" gravitational-turbulence scale L_STo that existed at beginning of fossilization, due to buoyant damping, of the material condensing to form the star: Star formation in Eagle Nebula.

The "Cat's Eye Nebula" in Draco, showing some observational candidates for evaporating primordial fog particles (PFPs). A pair of star-mass objects is in the center of the planetary nebula. One is a dying star which intermittently blasts away layers of gas that are captured or beamed away by the companion. The other has a spinning accretion disk (it may be a black hole) that electromagnetically produces narrow beams of plasma. These beams act like a powerful double searchlight that symmetrically illuminates everything in light-year diameter vicinity of the pair (such as the primordial fog particles, by evaporation). Compare with thousands of earth-mass cometary globules revealed by radiation from the dying star in the Helix Nebula, the planetary nebula closest to the earth. PFP candidates in Cat's Eye Nebula.

Recent Hubble Deep Field photographs, showing a young red galaxy less than a billion years old. The most red shifted galaxies only appear through the HST red filter, as shown on the right.
Great debate on the nature of the universe 1998.
American Astronomical Society Decadal Discussion WebPage : C. H. Gibson Contribution

Talk at APS/DFD 1997 San Francisco meeting "Turbulent Gravitational Instability and Dark Matter". Introduction. Linear versus non-linear theories. Cold spot condensation, hot spot void formation, Jeans spot damping. Plasma to gas to proto-globular-clusters to primordial fog particles. Conclusions.

Paper submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics, "Theory and Observations of Galactic Dark Matter, by C. H. Gibson and R. E. Schild (845 kb pdf file).
Figures (jpeg images): 1. Turbulence production of density microstructure, with and without gravity 2. Condensation and void formation on cold and hot spots 3. Protogalaxies to PFPs 4 Quasar Image A (94-95, Harvard/Princeton) 5 Quasar Image B (95-96, Harvard/Princeton/Canary Island) 6 Combined-3 observatory microlensing event 7a. Present theory 7b. Jeans theory 7c. Structure formation

Letter submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics, "The fluid mechanics of dark matter formation: Why does Jeans's (1902 & 1929) theory fail?" (465 kb pdf file).

Paper submitted to the Fluid Engineering Summer Meeting 1999, "Turbulent mixing, diffusion and gravity in the formation of cosmological structures: The fluid mechanics of dark matter" ( pdf file).

Talk at the Institute of Theoretical Physics, UCSB, Feb. 8, 2000, "Turbulence and Fossil Turbulence in Natural Fluids"

Talk at Imperial College of London, October 4, 2007, What is turbulence and which way does it cascade?

 

Seminar Schedules, Literature databases, Journals

MAE Department seminars, staff, faculty.
Fluid Mechanics seminars
Scripps Institution of Oceanography Physical Oceanography seminars
Physics Department seminars
CASS seminars.
OVID databases
UCSD Electronic journals
Astronomy and Astrophysics
Astrophysics Data System
Astrophysical Journal
Astronomical Journal
Monthly Notices Royal Astronomical Society


Jacobs School of Engineering.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Chancellor's website

Campus map

Calendar

Catalog UCSD

Divebums Tide Calendar SIO pier 2013

 

Help, for use of campus computers and other related services, is provided by the Academic Computer Services. UCSD campus information may be found through

Infopath

Webpage creation starting point:

StudentLink (faculty)

MAE Faculty Phone List

Beginners Guide to HTML


Dark matter workshops:
Sheffield September 7-12, 1996. Abstract submitted. Discussion group on self-gravitation. Slides for talk Sept. 8.
Heidelberg September 16-20, 1996. Abstract submitted.

UCLA January, 1998. Paper published.



Last edited May 22, 2008. For any questions, email to C. H. Gibson.

Shift from http://www-acs.ucsd.edu/~ir118 (~75k hits) to http://sdcc3.ucsd.edu Aug. 2, 2007.